Federal student loans, also known as Direct Loans, are funded by the government and may be awarded as part of your financial aid package if you completed the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®). They feature fixed interest rates and offer several repayment options. Private student loans are offered by banks or other lenders, are credit-based and have fixed or variable interest rates.
Offered terms are subject to change and state law restriction. Loans are offered through CommonBond Lending, LLC (NMLS # 1175900). The Annual Percentage Rates (APR) shown reflect the accruing interest, the effect of one-time capitalization of interest at the end of a deferment period, and the applicable Repayment Plan. All loans are eligible for a 0.25% reduction in interest rate by agreeing to automatic payment withdrawals once in repayment, which is reflected in the interest rates and APRs displayed. Variable rates may increase after consummation. All variable rates are based on a 1-month LIBOR assumption of 2.14% effective August 25, 2019.
One final thought concerning the use of private student loans: get a strong understanding of the interest rates as well as the loan’s other terms and conditions. Most lenders offer you a choice between a variable or fixed APR (annual percentage rate), so be sure to read up on the differences between the two interest rate options. Keep in mind that the rates advertised may not necessarily be the rates you qualify for based on your creditworthiness — or that of a qualifying cosigner.
Variable Rates: Starting variable rates range from 2.93% to 11.57% APR (with autopay), and will never exceed 13.95% (sometimes lower in certain states as required by law). For variable rate loans, the variable interest rate is derived from the one-month LIBOR rate plus a margin of between 0.86% and 9.76%. The current one-month LIBOR rate is 2.27%. Changes in the one-month LIBOR rate may cause your monthly payment to increase or decrease. Interest rates for variable rate loans are capped at 13.95%, unless required to be lower to comply with applicable law. Zero fees, period.
CommonBond isn’t just a student lender trying to make money. They do a lot of social good, too, much of which happens through a partnership with nonprofit Pencils of Promise. CommonBond also offers a program for businesses to offer student loan assistance as an employee benefit. Wouldn’t it be great if all employers helped with student loans? CommonBond offers four repayment options that start either in-school or after graduation.
There are no application, origination, or late fees from Discover. In fact, there are no fees at all. Discover doesn’t even charge late fees. That’s a unique and possibly valuable feature for some borrowers. In addition, Discover offers a 1.0% cash reward on each new student loan for borrowers with a 3.0 or better GPA. That’s a great good grades discount and another unique feature that makes Discover a good option for student loans.
The average savings amount is based on customers that consolidated student loans with us from 2014 through August 2018. Your actual savings amount might vary depending on your interest rate, loan balances, loan term and other factors. Depending on your new loan APR and repayment term, consolidation could increase the total cost and length of your loan.
You can also work for the Peace Corps to get a deferment of Stafford, Perkins, or Consolidation loans. If you work for Americorps for a year, you’ll receive $4,725 for your loans. Volunteering with Volunteers in Service to America for 1,700 hours will give you $4,725 for your loans, too. Thinking of joining the military? You can see the student loan benefit eligibility here.
One of the flexible repayment options we offer is the ability to temporarily stop (postpone) your student loan payments. This is called a deferment or forbearance. While they can be helpful solutions if you’re experiencing a temporary hardship, these are not good long-term solutions. Why? Because in most cases, interest will continue to accrue (accumulate) on your loan while you’re not making payments and may be capitalized (cause interest to accrue on interest). When you resume repayment (which you will have to do eventually) your loan balance will probably be even higher than it was before. If you’re having financial trouble, why set yourself back even further by doing this? There are often better solutions available. Before choosing deferment or forbearance, ask about enrolling in an income-driven repayment plan. Under those plans, if you make little or nothing, you pay little or nothing. Additionally, with the income-driven repayment plans, you’re working toward loan forgiveness while making a lower payment. Before postponing your payments, consider your other options.
Due to routine system maintenance, the StudentLoans.gov website is unavailable from 3 a.m. ET until 11 a.m. ET on Sunday, December 8, 2019. You may not sign master promissory notes, complete counseling or TEACH Grant processing flows, or submit Loan Consolidation applications or Income-Driven Repayment Plan requests. Please attempt to log in to the website after the outage period ends. We apologize for any inconvenience this outage may cause and appreciate your understanding and patience while we complete this important activity.
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